Accelerating the Charge ⚡️

Tag: Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) (Page 1 of 2)

Toyota continues to focus on gas burning vehicles for Latin America, blaming a lack of government guidelines for slow EV adoption

Toyota is forecasting only 2.5% of its anticipated 6 million vehicle sales in Latin America in 2030 to be battery electric vehicles (BEV).

Every day, it is harder to deny electric vehicles are the next great advance in transportation. Not because governments mandate them., but because they are better than what we drive today. Yet, Toyota continues to work against this, and endangering our health and lives by encouraging their customers to create more climate changing pollution.

Bloomberg »

Toyota Motor Corp. may be splashing out around $35 billion globally on its battery-electric-car push but in Latin America, electric vehicles will only comprise about 5% of the region’s total market by 2030, the Japanese automaker’s president and chief executive officer for Latin America and the Caribbean said.

Masahiro Inoue blames a lack of government guidelines is part of the reason for the slow EV adoption.

It’s important Brazil take the lead, considering it’s “one of the rare countries that has a complete automobile industry,” Inoue said in an interview with Bloomberg News. “In the southern hemisphere only Brazil has this situation,” he added. Neighboring nations could follow what Brazil decides, whether that’s embracing a hybrid, flex-hybrid or a purely electric strategy.

Inoue sees around 6 million cars being sold in Latin America and the Caribbean, excluding Mexico, in 2030, with about half of those going to Brazil. While that represents growth of 40% compared to 2021 levels, just 5% of those cars are expected to be EVs. Around 10% may be plug-in hybrids while almost 40% will be so-called flexible-hybrid cars, or ones that have an electric engine combined with a combustion engine that can run with gasoline or ethanol.

EV Trend » New car registrations in the UK in November rose slightly as EVs increase market share

Hybrids and EVs claim a 27 percent market share of November 2021 sales.

Electric vehicle boom fuels rise in UK new car sales » The Guardian »

Almost 22,000 pure electric vehicles were registered in November, more than double the 10,345 registered in the same month last year, as the share of total sales accounted for by battery-powered electric vehicles climbed to 19%.

The Tesla Model 3 was the third bestselling car, with 3,077 sold, and is the bestselling pure electric vehicle in the UK, according to the figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT).

The boom in electric car sales helped overall sales of new cars to reach 115,706 in November, a 1.7% rise on the same month last year. While the increase is a welcome boost for the car industry, sales are still close to a third down on pre-pandemic levels.

“After four miserable months that the motor industry would rather forget, the tide is finally turning for new car sales,” said James Fairclough, the chief executive of AA Cars. “But the patch supply of new vehicles continues to peg back the number of sales dealers can make. Stock levels of some vehicles are so low that some dealers are even struggling to offer test drives.”

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UK car manufacturing in October down 41.4%, while EV production rose 17.5%

  • 30.9% of all cars made in the UK in October were either battery electric (BEV), plug-in (PHEV), or hybrid electric (HEV) models.
  • UK car manufacturing fell October 41.4% to 64,726 units produced.
  • Output for domestic and overseas markets declines, down 37.9% and 42.1%.

UK car production declined 41.4 percent in October 2021 as factories turned out 64,729 units, according to the latest figures released today by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT).

It was the fourth straight month of decline and the weakest October since 1956 as firms grappled with the global shortage of semiconductors which led to production stoppages. The weak output totals compared to last year are exacerbated by the closure of a UK car plant at the end of July, a deficit that will impact figures for a year.

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Sales headed towards 5.6 million EVs in 2021 as automakers target 40 million per year by 2030

Source » BloombergNEF

Global momentum towards zero-emissions has accelerated significantly in recent years. In spite of the global supply chain shortages, EV sales are on track for around 5.6 million units this year, up from 2.1 million in 2019, and 3.1 million in 2020.

Bloomberg’s Zero-Emission Vehicles Factbook notes, the “global clean road transport market” will be worth around $244 billion this year. The report was released simultaneously with a pledge by several leading automakers who collectively committed to sell around 40 million EVs per year by 2030.

Bloomberg »

Passenger electric vehicle sales are set to jump over 80% in 2021, to 5.6 million units, off the back of unprecedented industry and government commitments around the world over the last two years, according to the Zero-Emission Vehicles Factbook, a special report published today by BloombergNEF (BNEF), at the request of the U.K. COP26 Presidency and in partnership with Bloomberg Philanthropies.

The Factbook documents the progress that has been made towards global net-zero emissions in the road transport sector, and shows that the future is brighter than ever for zero-emission vehicles. In the first half of 2021, sales of passenger electric vehicles (including battery electric, plug-in hybrid and fuel cell vehicles) were 140% higher than the same period in 2019, reaching 7% of global passenger vehicle sales. This compares with just 2.6% in 2019, the year of the last UN Climate Change Conference.

The total global fleet of passenger electric and fuel cell vehicles now totals nearly 13 million, of which 8.5 million are true zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs), either battery electric or fuel cell (still, fuel cell vehicles account for a fraction of that total). The latter figure is up from just 4.6 million at the time of COP25. At the same time, by 1H 2021, the global fleet of zero-emission buses has increased by 22% since 2019, and we expect 18% of all municipal buses on the road to be zero-emission at the end of 2021.

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Source » BloombergNEF

Download » Zero-Emission Vehicles Factbook

More new EVs will be registered in the UK in 2021 than in the whole of the last decade

James Fossdyke / Motor1 »

The figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) indicate around 287,000 plug-in vehicles will be registered in 2021 – more the number registered between 2010 and 2019.

According to the SMMT, a total of 271,962 new battery electric (BEVs) and plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) were registered between 2010 and 2019. However, with more than 236,000 new BEVs and PHEVs registered during the first 10 months of the year, the SMMT is expecting that number to be surpassed by the end of 2021.

So far this year, BEVs have accounted for most of the UK’s plug-in car registrations, with more than 141,000 registered between January 1 and October 31. In comparison, just over 95,400 plug-in hybrids have been registered over the same period. Together, the two technologies account for 16.6 percent of all new car sales in the UK.

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Elsewhere » The Energyst

Demand in the UK for used EVs surges despite the overall market falling

Demand for used battery electric (BEV) and plug-in hybrid (PHEV) vehicles in the UK continued to grow in Q3 2021, according to the latest figures released today by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT).

Reflecting recent trends in both the new and used markets, BEV demand rose 56.4% with 14,182 cars changing hands. PHEV transactions rose by 43.3% to 14,990 EVs. Meanwhile, overall UK used car transactions fell -6.2% against strong Q3 2020 to 2,034,342 units.

Indeed, the number of used BEVs that changed hands during the period was the highest recorded in any quarter. Hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) transactions also increased by 20.3% to 40,157.

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