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Tag: Brazil

Toyota continues to focus on gas burning vehicles for Latin America, blaming a lack of government guidelines for slow EV adoption

Toyota is forecasting only 2.5% of its anticipated 6 million vehicle sales in Latin America in 2030 to be battery electric vehicles (BEV).

Every day, it is harder to deny electric vehicles are the next great advance in transportation. Not because governments mandate them., but because they are better than what we drive today. Yet, Toyota continues to work against this, and endangering our health and lives by encouraging their customers to create more climate changing pollution.

Bloomberg »

Toyota Motor Corp. may be splashing out around $35 billion globally on its battery-electric-car push but in Latin America, electric vehicles will only comprise about 5% of the region’s total market by 2030, the Japanese automaker’s president and chief executive officer for Latin America and the Caribbean said.

Masahiro Inoue blames a lack of government guidelines is part of the reason for the slow EV adoption.

It’s important Brazil take the lead, considering it’s “one of the rare countries that has a complete automobile industry,” Inoue said in an interview with Bloomberg News. “In the southern hemisphere only Brazil has this situation,” he added. Neighboring nations could follow what Brazil decides, whether that’s embracing a hybrid, flex-hybrid or a purely electric strategy.

Inoue sees around 6 million cars being sold in Latin America and the Caribbean, excluding Mexico, in 2030, with about half of those going to Brazil. While that represents growth of 40% compared to 2021 levels, just 5% of those cars are expected to be EVs. Around 10% may be plug-in hybrids while almost 40% will be so-called flexible-hybrid cars, or ones that have an electric engine combined with a combustion engine that can run with gasoline or ethanol.

Leaked documents show how countries are trying to change a crucial scientific report on how to tackle climate change

Justin Rowlatt & Tom Gerken, BBC »

The leak reveals Saudi Arabia, Japan and Australia are among countries asking the UN to play down the need to move rapidly away from fossil fuels.

This “lobbying” raises questions for the COP26 climate summit in November.

The leak reveals countries pushing back on UN recommendations for action and comes just days before they will be asked at the summit to make significant commitments to slow down climate change and keep global warming to 1.5 degrees.

One senior Australian government official rejects the conclusion that closing coal-fired power plants is necessary, even though ending the use of coal is one of the stated objectives the COP26 conference.

Greenpeace Unearthed »

Some of the world’s biggest coal, oil, beef and animal feed-producing nations are attempting to strip a landmark UN climate report of findings that threaten those domestic economic interests, a major leak of documents seen by Unearthed has revealed.

The revelations – which show how this small clutch of nations is attempting to water-down the International Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) major upcoming assessment of the world’s options for limiting global warming – come just days before the start of crucial international climate negotiations in Glasgow.

They come from a leak of tens of thousands of comments by governments, corporations, academics and others on the draft report of the IPCC’s ‘Working Group III’ – an international team of experts that is assessing humanity’s remaining options for curbing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or removing them from the atmosphere.

Euronews Green »

China, Saudi Arabia, India and Australia were among those who submitted comments urging scientists to downplay or “omit” phrases about the need to transition away from fossil fuels. Officials from the Australian government reportedly questioned the need for all of its coal-fired power plants to close as part of efforts to tackle the climate crisis.

The Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) represents 13 major oil-producing nations. It asked the authors to remove the statement: “If warming is to be restricted to 2°C, about 30% of oil, 50% of gas, and 80% of coal reserves will remain unburnable”.

Also » Nikkei

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